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yes, countries -- if we look at the most recent presidential election in the united states, there was something if he went through the republican primaries people were saying let's not this person. it's not tim pawlenty dropshot right after the audio what caucuses and then michele bachman dropshot and new gingrich can you are left with a sort of one person left standing. it's not about picking a winner. it's about picking losers. this is not the person, this is not the person. and finally you get the last person standing. the process of elimination. >> host: which is consistent in better organization it tends to be. >> it is a simplified version of reality that i think you used to build the theories that are simple and then you make them more complex but if you take say gee so they're famous for the way they choose leaders. we always tell our students g is a company that works in practice but not in theory. it doesn't seem to do any of the things that we say it should do but it is successful. and if you have the competency, it seems to be that it's good at picking leaders c
presidential election in the united states, there was something if he went through their public and primaries that people were saying it's not this person. tim pawlenty drops out and then michele bachmann drops out and then newt gingrich drops out and eventually you are left with the last person standing. it's not about picking a winner. it's about picking losers. this is not the 1 -- person and finally gets the last person standing. >> host: a process of elimination, which is consistent in whatever organization it is. >> guest: i think it is in the sense that it's a simplified version of reality, that i think you used to build very. theory star simple and you make a more complex but if you take ge. ge is famous for the way it chooses leaders. we always tell her students, ge is the company that works in practice but not in theory. it doesn't seem to do anything as we say it should do but it is profitable and successful. if you had to pick ge's core competency it seems to be it's good at picking leaders and developing managers in training managers and picking the right people. ge spends 20 y
with what we think this has to do with the election and gender and sexual politics are kind of in this larger context. >> i think it does. one of the things that is interesting about the president, coming out the freedom to marry or what seemed like the vice president accidentally coming out in a way. [laughter] but what's really to your point, while these things are very important and i think that they have a clear role in places like maryland where the marriage referendums on the ballot. the timing was the backlash about what i care about. and that happened early to get the, you know, what is going to happen when my one-man or support of lgt whites come out, how will this impact the election? there was an early test and we got a chance to get those issues out of the way so that they were not the things we were talking about. >> it was almost as though the last election was one in which barack obama and his very embodiment challenged about blacks and every time he referred to the single mother, they would blink and say oh, it's not a black single mother, to white single mot
's filtration processes. the most recent presidential election in the united states. there was something, if you went through the republican primaries, that people were saying, well, it's not this person. it's not -- tim drops out after the iowa caucuses and michele bachmann, and newt gingrich, and you're left with a last person standing. most often, it's not about picking a winner, but it's about picking losers. this is not the person. this is not the person, and finally, you get a last person standing. >> host: process of elimination. >> guest: exactly. >> host: which is consistent in whatever organization it is? >> guest: so -- >> host: has to be? >> guest: i think it is in the sense that it's a platonic idea, a simp fied # version of reality that i think you use to build theory. start with simple and make them more complex, but if you take, say, ge. so ge is famous for the way it chooses leaders. ge, we always tell students ge is a company that works in practice, but not in theory. it doesn't seem to do anything of the things we say it should do, but it's incredibly profit l and successful.
compromise. in november 1860 after his election, the country was gripped because many southerners felt in the republican party, the republican party was in northern party and proudly so. they did not have a significant southern connection. lincoln was elected without a single electoral vote without any of the southern states. the first time in the nations history, a party without any notable southern components would be taking over the executive branch of the national government. but there was more. the republican party was probably a northern party. during its existence in the mid-1850s, the rhetoric had assaulted the south and racial slavery, their determination -- the republicans determination, were to win a national election without any southern support and republicans repeatedly condemned this undemocratically, even on american way. with this party on the threshold of the presidency, seven radicals, those people who preached the gospel of the union, they took to the public platform and newspaper columns to proclaim that the crisis of the south was at hand. the south had act immedi
to call. we do not expect to witness an election won by a landslide. some will look longingly on the time when one candidate dominated the political scene. lyndon johnson readily beat barry goldwater and richard nixon, overwhelming george mcgovern. each of those elections, one of the candidates failed to capture the spirit of the american voting public and the winner had the advantage of a weak opponent. franklin roosevelt won his second term landslide because of his huge popularity. however, in many more presidential elections, the candidates are in a pitted battle to present themselves as the one best capable of serving the country, with the winner walking off with a modest majority. there is customary wisdom, a campaign between the incumbent president and his opponent will be either a referendum on the first term of the president or a judgment of which candidate will be the better leader. is there really a difference between these two considerations? does it not boil down to judging the leadership skill of the incumbent based on his effectiveness during his first term versus the unknow
you actually think that the people iran in 2010 and got elected or for that matter the people iran before and have now ascended to positions believe that no is a solution or that they were elected to not do things as opposed to do things? >> well, again, from the class of 2010 and now i refer to the 87 freshmen, the so-called deep party class of the 100th of congress, i think their belief is that they are doing precisely what the people who elected them with some do which was several back all obama initiatives, to cut spending, a lot of them doubt that the debt ceiling should not be increased under any circumstances, and to that degree they feel like that was a failure. but, no, they basically believe that their job is first to obstruct barack obama and then once there is a republican president in place to pass those initiatives that create a better business climate, more and more deregulation, the funding of programs that have never quite been near and dear to them. yes. i think that they do believe. and, of course, after you flash toward a bit, i expect to will talks about the de
the latino vote and, ultimately, the election during the presidential primaries. he was part of a panel on immigration policy and the gop. from the american enterprise institute, this is 90 minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, everybody. my name is nick schulz, i'm the dewitt wallace fellow here at the american enterprise institute, and i'm the editor of american.com, aei's flagship online magazine. want to thank you for coming to our event today, conservatives and immigration reform, now what? i'd like to thank, before i get started, i'd like to thank my colleague dan rothschild here at aei who had the idea for doing this event and helped bring it all together. dan's had an issue in this for a long time, as have i, and i think it's timely and important that we start talking about some of these things. you know, there's been a tension at the heart of the conservative movement's approach to immigration for at least as long as i've polled politics and -- followed politics and a lot longer than that. there are two influential camps that have jockeyed for control to define th
it very, very neat and controversial election that was decided that the house of representatives. he wanted to speak to this idea that we were all americans again and certainly that's the way i wish we would feel after the storm and aftermath of that. so we can learn from these moments americans are very good at coming together. doesn't feel that way right now in the midst of this election, but we also have this extraordinary moment, where we have a crisis and moment of division butting heads against each other. i am hopeful we can learn from our history and see that americans to respond to a crisis like this. >> host: as kenneth davis alluded to, the reason he's in new york and both tedious and washington is because of sandy. we had studio issuescome the sore little patch together for this "in depth" with kenneth davis. your most recent "don't know much about the american presidents" is about the american president and you talk about a couple elections. i went to took about 1800 the election of james k. polk versus henry clay. you compare those talking about how vicious they were. i
is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas, then governor of arkansas president of the united states. this is something which everyone who knows him knows about because he talks about it all the time. he does not go to the university of arkansas. he goes to georgetown. from georgetown to becomes the arkansas candidate and then goes to oxford. he's an incredible success everywhere, but he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he's attracted to the kind of women as mother directs in two, the beauty queens, the ones who are flirtatious, who are attractive and that's really where his eyes at 10 until he comes back to be a law school. there he meets hillary rodham. >> imacs, author and lecturer, kenneth davis, cleaned author of the don't know much about serious talks about history, geography and more. the selling off there has written 12 adult nonfiction books including the hidden history, and nation rising and is 2012 release, "don't know >> host: author kennetn presidents." >> host: author kenneth davis, where did they don't know much series of books come fro
before the midterm elections. robert kennedy is meeting in his office and they are trying to work out deals privately about this. word has just come to kennedy that an american surveillance plan has been shot down. and kennedy has a tape recorder rolling and talks to buddy kennedy. and kennedy thinking, okay, we think the plane has been shot down. now what do we do? and he's going through, he is thinking about the political pressures and it is such a remarkable moment that you get to hear in real time, struggling through, what do we do? do we retaliate? we sent our planes over? as it happened, he was handed a reprieve. it was a false alarm. but you get the sense of what kennedy is still facing. this is a week after the 13 days >> host: kennedy was acutely useful of escalation and how they would lose control of the situation, except now with nuclear weapons. so the contingency plan had been to shoot down them and kennedy refused to authorize it because he was so afraid of it. it wasn't just a question of what kind of plane,. there were some planes that were safer and less horrible to b
stayed with them as a colleague during the civil war and after grant was elected president initially appointed washburn secretary of state and washburn became very ill, after ten days he submitted his resignation to president grant show grant regretfully had his resignation and he regained his health which was always very fragile and grant the then offered him the position as minister of france, ambassador of france. >> michael hill on washburn, minister to france in the 1870 franco prussian war, and the only power of the state providing political and humanitarian support. q&a sunday night at 8:00 on c-span. >> now a discussion on entrepreneurship, immigration reform and innovation. economist douglas holtz-eakin and aol co-founder steve case, at the aspen institute for 30 minutes. >> next we have a panel on america and where it is going, steve clemens -- steve clemons is the empress area of washington ideas. >> hey, folks. everybody is running to the thompson reuters counter. thank you for joining us. great to be with you. i am steve -- steve clemons, editor of large of the atlantic,
out before the election. i am against it. [laughter] liberals have been the primary practitioner and a start with ratio demagoguery when every police shooting where the black kid was treated suddenly the klan had taken over the police force. they are finn natgas of various poses and mike trayvon martin they just dusts -- disappear with the facts came out you never see the final article attention readers, that story we have been hysterical about. [laughter] actually he was muddying the copper ore he did ambush because they would disappear from the news. one of the best of my coat was called to become artist it takes a dozen cops to subdue him two weeks later he was in a comment if he dies of pneumonia say they he died as a result of police brutality. the cops are put on trial for manslaughter and are acquitted the "new york times" the editorial was remembering my goal that no justice could be done now flashed to the rosenbaum case with all sharpton who has many cameo appearances. i have forgotten everything he was involved in. [laughter] and once put on trial and there was sick a
, caught up with polls. resort have seen in this election cycle. and i think with latinos we cite polling with specific issues but is that a better understanding of where they're coming from you will get an understanding of why they're answering the questions that way. but i believe with the latino community, we lost the latino vote because of immigration. if we would have a better position on immigration, from the get-go, from the primary governor romney would've been competitive and it would've been competitive in those battleground states where the latino vote was decisive. and, finally, we have to stop being rockefeller republicans. we are not the party of the 47%. you know, when governor romney said what he did last week that obama won because it gives to latinos and other minorities, that's insulting. latinas didn't vote for obama because obamacare. i think he is engaging obama in the same type of class warfare discussion that obama wants to have. i think we have to go back to the conservative populism of ronald reagan, which is to talk about the economy. but i would say something i
election. robert kennedy is meeting in his office with the soviet ambassador. they are frying to work out the deals. privately about this. word has come to kennedy in the oval office that an american plane, the pentagon told him that the american surveillance plane may have been shot down over cuba. kennedy has the tape recorder rolling and talking to robbie kennedy while the prime minister is -- ambassador is the room. we think a plane has been shut down. what do we do? and he's going through do we do air strikes? he's talking about the things about the prelim performs going to be faced when it comes out. it's one of the remarkable moments you get to hear a.in real time struggling through, okay, now what go do? do we retaliate and send our planes over and knock out the airfield which would have reinflamed the crisis. kennedy was having a reprieve. it was a false alarm. they had scrammed. they hadn't shut down an american plane. you goat windows and you get a sense of the tension what kennedy is facing. had is, you know, a week after the 30 the days. you get a sense how close military act
a low profile. sheraton did not. urged on by grant, he alone removed to elected officials who defied congress' policies. fired scores of them. to the governor's of louisiana and texas. there indian warrior slaughtering settlers in western kansas and eastern colorado. it was here he began prosecuting with brutal effect for the decorate that -- strategy he implemented in the shenandoah valley, one of total war. as waged in the shenandoah valley. it was a milder form of the cruder -- they were in agreement that in inflicting suffering on southern civilians would more quickly end the bloodshed. in urging sheraton to conduct the war in the shenandoah, if the war is to last another year, we the valley to remain barren waste. he a barn full of wheat i would rather sooner lose the barn and wheat than my son. unlike the broader sill burning as it was called horrified and bittered valley residences. one described how the innovators came up the valley sweeping everything before them like a hurricane. there's nothing left from the horse down to the chick. en. raid the new settlement on the plain
, this is unprecedented whether right or wrong, but it's something that was done not only during the elections, but a statement made by the president more than once, and i think it was in connection of promises made also to the israeli prime minister. how, will president obama fulfill the promise? wiggle out of it? absolutely implement it whether it's militarily or through containment policy, and what are they doing from my point of view, one of the reasons or a fascinating part about the gaza operation is that, a, they are giving hamas a lead in creating the new dynamics or dictating dynamics in an alliance of the muslim brotherhood leadership's be it in egypt or turkey, and it's probably the move to undermind the palestinian authority because he's going to the united nations asking for the status of the states, observer state, but the change of subject, at least by the israelis away from iran and syria, on to gaza, to me, is a very fascinating development. is it temporary or going to be an ongoing -- how long is that change of subject? sometimes leaders and security people know better. they
of taxpayers' money to waste 1 hundred million pounds on a crime committee election? >> right across the country we're going to have local foreign order champions who will stand up and make sure we get a good deal from the police. i have noticed there are two criticisms of the police and crime commissioners. on the one hand they said this been too much money and on the other hand they said we did on spending of promoting it. i can have one criticism or the other but not both? >> the british government borrowed money at record low levels saying taxpayers billions of pounds. >> my friend makes a good point. because we have an incredible plan to get on top of debt and deficit, to show how we will pay our way in the world we have record low interest rates. low interest rates described by the shatter chancellor as a key test of economic credibility. >> ed miller band? >> can i start by joining the prime minister in paying tribute to walter berry of first battalion richmond of scotland. he should yet most courage and bravery and all our thoughts and condolences are for his family and frien
. actually, during the summer of 1992, as the political season was heating up before the election, nixon and i had both heard some strange clicking sounds on his telephone. and he said, "you know, the phone may be tapped." and i said, "well, it certainly could be." and he said, "well, let's try a little experiment." he said, "i'm going to call you." and he was on his way to california. so he said, "i'm going to call you from california at your home, and i'm going to tell you that i'm going to come out endorsing ross perot for the presidency." c-span: and he thought that the bush administration was afraid of this? >> guest: yes. yes. actually, both sides might think, "well, what was going on with richard nixon if he's endorsing ross perot?" so he said, "i'm going to tell you that i'm endorsing ross perot. i want you to keep a straight face and a straight voice. don't let on to anything." and he said, "we're going to set this person up if, in fact, there are wiretaps on my phone." so he flew to california, he called me, we went through this little episode, and then nothing ever came of it.
was the secretary of commerce for a couple of years, and after i negotiated salary then governor elect renegotiated a salary not upward but downward as it turns out. that's why he hasn't forgiven me. we became friends as he served in the administration, and in 1993, twenty years ago, after coming offer the statewide campaign, jeb and i were playing golf in miami and we went back to his house and i said, gee, jeb, i think that i'm considering running for governor. he said what? you're running for governor? i wouldn't do that if i were you. i'm going run for governor, we think long and hard about these things, i'm going do it. and that was in february of '93 and since that time, i've had the honor and privilege to be his partner. i was chairman of his three-gubernatorial campaigns, and we have been great friends and i have been honored to serve under his leadership. he was a principal governor, principle politician and he used every bit of his political power to work for kids who have no other advocates and for parents most of whom didn't vote for him. he was all in on education, and used every bit o
in the election of 1964. johnson listens to this, and he says very somberly, dick, if that is the price for the spell, i will gladly pay it. a remarkable story of hers. if i may just help one more quick story about his loyalty. as harry knows, he was fiercely loyal to those who worked with him. when the staff was leaving the white house in 1959 and they were going back and finding jobs, lbj wanted to make sure that everybody landed in a good job. transitioning with good prospects. there was one guy who worked as a legal counsel for lbj. he signed out of the white house in order to go to los angeles to talk about starting a washington office for this prosperous firm. the new that he had signed out in order to take this interview. going to los angeles, he meets with the partners of this law firm in a conference room and they are all hundred together. they are very frustrated and one partner says, okay, you take a call from the president. they all leave and pearson gets on the phone. and he says, i don't know if you noticed, but i signed out of the white house and i'm in los angeles. lbj s
willingly lose an election if i could solve these problems. it is that serious. tim geithner, the treasury secretary, in the book is quoted thousands of words telling the president, you have got to do something about this problem. we have to fix it. you literally, it's not that we're going to close down the government, we will close down the american economy and, in turn, the global economy. if they do not solve the issue of this runaway spending, get some way to stop borrowing in excess, he tells the president of the united states if we default on this, on our obligations and our ious, we will trigger a depression worse than the 1930s. anybody here remember the 19 1930s depression? you probably don't. i don't. i was not born, but i've read about it. it was a calamity for the world. tim geithner said to the president what, if we default on this, if we do not solve this problem, we will have an economic catastrophe that will make the 2008 financial crisis a footnote in the history books. anyone remember the 2008 financial crisis? that's coming not from some columnist or journalist, that is
them to young or not. they bickered about the process of holding elections in the territory. they argued about it recently conducted census. babbitt, rather up wisely, took issue with young's conduct of such matters, and by the end of the meeting, young unloaded his fury on babbitt. this is what he said. if you interfere with any of my dictations in the election, it will be the last time. now, i don't want to hear you say this is not right and that is not right. you are nothing but a stinking politician. i know more about sound questions and doctrine and laws than you. i am not willing to suffer this people to be interrupted. you are rotten now with gentilism. the lord only knows what. i despise it as i despise the gates of hell. you ought to say mormonism is my controller. my governorship and everything else is to bow down to mormonism. it wouldn't have been really all that remarkable for brigham young to have browbeaten a fellow church member who was, perhaps, not acting in the church's best interest, but young had a larger purpose in mind. he delivered this harangue in th
by the age of 17 is planning to be elected attorney general of arkansas and governor of arkansas and then president of the united states. this is something which everyone you knows him knows about because he talks about it all the time. he goes to georgetown and from georgetown he becomes a candidate for a rhodes fellowship and goes to -- he cannot have a sustained ongoing relationship with a woman. he is attracted to the kind of women his mother directs him to gore the beauty queens, who are the ones who are flirtatious and who are attractive and that is really where his eyes had been. and tell the goes to yale law school. there he meets hillary rodham. >> you can watch this and other programs on line at booktv.org. now on booktv, nicole eustace examines the effects the war of 1812 had on american politics and patriotism. the author reports at the end of the three year war resulted in the quote era of good feelings marked by defuse partisanship and greater nationalism. it's a little over an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much for that introduction and thank you to the david
to the election every outlet came up with a short list of the cabinet for mitt romney come in for president obama. when you talk about setting up this agency council how do you guard against some sort of volatility in the national energy policy from the changing administration and the policies put in place by one administration carried over the success reforms. >> one person has to take the recommendations seriously and consider that this has merit as the president in the issues i had the the president gave significance and this could be very significant move by the administration is taken seriously by everybody in the government and that in itself was a tremendous incentive to coordination. >> there will also be volatility in a second term there will be changes that have been there for four years or ready to get out but also this isn't something that would be done instantaneously i don't think it would be done under our proposal until the end of the fourth quarter given times so that would be available to the administration i don't think it would be that big a problem although if you had the who
and before the iranian election? >> no, i have not given up on it at all. but i would like to be more clear in terms of our standpoint , it is not necessarily successful in those options, but other options, what options we really have in the negotiation? and to assess this in terms of political, strategic, and even moral abilities with what it is that should determine the nature of our own conduct. i would like to avoid a situation in which someone comes to us and says, a year has passed. there is no achievement. we want new red lines. and we are now in the danger zone. what would you have to do? and i'm not sure we have to do it. that is more likely if we have some alternative. all options are on the table. and i think the meaningful alternative is a combination of a kind of, if you will, a set of human rights policies towards the soviet union in the mid- mid-70s with, at the same time, an effort to reassure those in the region that are not more portable to intimidation or aggression and to convince the iranians that they would first have to take all the resources the united states possess
with president obama's biographers after his re-election. hear from journalists ron suskind, author of "the confidence men: wall street, washington, and the education of a president." the atlantic, aspen institute, and the newseum hosted the forum. >> we have one titled "why did he win and why did he lose"? it was about obama, and now the title is "how did he win?" we have three authors of excellent books about president obama, john alter, ron suskind, and draifd maraniss who will be interviewedded by a great biographer, and my former editor, walter isakson, and asked the question what is he really like? >> and where is the profile? >> yeah. it's only laptop. i'll get it to you after this is over. walter, thank you. >> margaret, thank you, thank you, all, great to be here. [applause] david, for those who can't figure out which is wish, david, jonathan, and that's ron. the next book -- in fact, starting in the middle with john. talking about -- i can say your title; right? >> well, it would be the first time, but that's all right. >> breaking news here. those who like the fall can,s things f
was a huge year. you had johnson resigning, decided not to go for another term. yet nixon's election, assassination of mr. king and bobby kennedy. you had democratic party's wild convention in chicago. so a lot of books on 68, woodstock and also months and that sort of thing. so i'm afraid my book is by no means unique. there's also a book on 1964, which makes pretty much the same argument as i do, only he sets a year earlier. i don't have been a huge quarrel with that. i wouldn't say i'm the only person who's right about this, the 65 did seem to be the time, not that it was the most romantic. 68 probably was in terms of world shattering, memorable events. but it was a time when the 50s and early 60s rapidly vanished or began to vanish from view and a hurry. the real reason, that's why. >> i think i've pretty much agree with you that the central year is 1965. but there's something more at stake in your book, at least i think so. i want to prove i'm not. in a way we can either be talking about the 60s and just talking about were 65 hits in the 1960s, but there's a claim in the book on
about barack obama running for the presidency in 2008 if he had lost the illinois senate election, not if he had won it. that's the level of national security we're talking about here. >> harvard business school professor profiles historic and
the 1930's. >>host: the 2012 election? >> at one to talk about that. i am tired of 2012. talk about the future. that was not good. we have to figure out to appeal to a bigger electorate. >> rerunning for president? >> that is classified. it is too early to make that decision. >>host: government believes. >> as part of the university's serious we visit campuses across the country talking to professors or authors we're at the u.s. naval academy in annapolis merrill lynch. with professor aaron o'connell also the author of this book "underdogs" the making of the modern marine corps." professor when was the marine corps established? >> 1775 but the birthday is us mess. the record always claims november but that is the date that congress authorized but they never raised the battalion raised then. >> day never were. but the first goes then 28 november but 10 november still celebrated as a birthday. >>host: what was the purpose of the marine corps? >> to be the guard on a ship to protect the officers from
elections. as well as a growing pressure from congress as will some u.s. allies in the region against diplomacy. focus shifted to sanctions and tehran responded by further expanding its nuclear program leaving both sides worse off today than they were a few years ago. in the meantime, sanctions have held iranian middle class for the impoverished population while the regime's repression and human rights abuses have continued to intensify and its nuclear program has continued to expand. but a new window for opportunity for diplomacy has opened through obama's convincing real election, and in the next few months, up until the iranian new year, both sides enjoy maximum political space and maneuverability to negotiate effectively. the logic of diplomacy is obvious. it's the only option that can truly resolve the issue. sanctions can cripple iran's economy at the expense of destiny that pro-democracy movement there, but sanctions alone cannot resolve this issue. the military option can set back the program for a year or two but only at the expense of ensuring that eventually iran eventually
in the senate and stock didn't go up. we elected a house stronger than the last one. the president got elected to four years, lost two seat in the senate but would you rather have 60 or 15 or more than 40? more than 40, enough to filibuster, not enough to pass something which is where we were before. the disappointment was we didn't take the senate. when you look two years ahead there's every reason to think -- half of what we do focus on the states and as you mentioned we had 48 states and two meetings, 90 people get together -- >> in the morning -- >> no time for one and it is not work. we didn't have people who won the house in 2010, what do we do now? >> not going to top that. >> floating is not working. >> thank you, appreciate it. we appreciate vote politicos who made this possible. thank you for coming out, we appreciate it. we have a breakfast next wednesday, bob woodward and senator marco rubio, grover norquist, thank you. [applause] ♪ >> the u.s. senate dabbles in today about an hour from now at 10:00 eastern and today they will continue working on legislation dealing with equal ri
this many times, presidential elections are referendums on the incumbent party and in that vein such as the case as i believe it is, then you have to say that it's a judge to by the electorate was not a tremendous perhaps lackluster but not so as to make him ineligible for rehiring. second, when the country is in a serious political deadlock of the kind that we are in now and it's happened in our history but it doesn't happen often it generally means that the deadlock is focused on a definition question of america, and the definition question faced in this country is that we are going to go towards a european style of social democracy or more towards the traditional conservative populism of jackson or ronald reagan. third, when the country manages to deal with such a deadlock or change such a deadlock as this it doesn't come to any other means. so you have a lot of red and that may be a good harbinger for your party but it doesn't say anything about how the country is going to move forward in terms of what you promote. so given all of that if you buy any of it, to what extent do
elected from 1964 to 2008 comes from a state of the sun belt. lyndon johnson, nixon from california, gerald ford was never elected so he doesn't count. jimmy carter, ronald reagan from california, the first george bush from texas, bill clinton from arkansas and the second bush from texas since 2008 is a watershed election. there were critical of the politics that the flood that came out of the sun belt. they tended to be oriented around issues of strong national defense of an opposition to the union and the defense of the free enterprise politics. and also it's in the sun belt in the south and the southwest that we see the rise by the 1970's to talk about is the religious right's involved in the political process in the new and important ways. so he was at the forefront of all of those issues and his own politics national defence, a staunch anti-communist that set an important goal in the right wing anticommunist politics in the 1960's one of the things that led the party is in 1964. even the early in his career he was a staunch advocate of the unions in south carolina back in the 3
elected officials who defied congress' policies. fired scores of them. city alderman, governors of louisiana and texas. consequently, president johnson removed sheridan as military governor. he was transferred to the west to command the district encompassing the southern great plains. they are, indian warrior bands were slaughtering settlers in western kansas and eastern colorado. and it was here that sheridan begin prosecuting with brutal effectiveness, a strategy that implemented in the shenandoah valley, one of cold war. as wage in the shenandoah valley was a milder form that did not distinguish between soldiers and civilians. by 1864, lincoln, grant, sheridan and sherman were in agreement that inflicting suffering on seven civilians would more quickly and the bloodshed. and urging shared into conduct the cold war and the shinto, grant wrote him if the war is to last another year, we want the shenandoah valley to remain a barren waste. sheridan believed it was more merciful to destroy property and to kill southern men. he wrote, if i had a barn full of weeds and enhance them,
and people demonstrations and even cross vote districts to get people elected, and i found a tape where they are basically saying, yes, you helped me get elected, and, therefore, i'm going to make you the head of the housing authority, which he did. you are right that when these allegations of physical abuse and financial misdeeds happened, the slate that he helped elect, you know, the district attorney, counsel member harvey, they turned a blind eye to it. you are right. of course, they were killed about ten days after the massacre happened. you had angela davis -- you know, on the outside, people's temple looked good. i talk about in the prologue, for me, growing up as i did with a black brother, looking for a place to belong, if i came to a temperature l service on a sunday morning and seen this, i would have definitely had been interested. my brother, david, and i, i would have been interested because of his message of social justice. i would have been interested because there was real love between temple members. i mean, having grown up in the qhurnlg, a church is -- church, a chur
and run amok and it has become of bully. >>host: november 2012 what did those elections clarify? >>guest: lot that we need to do something to grow as as a party and are in danger of becoming a dinosaur if we cannot figure out what they want in doing gland and around the great lakes purposely cannot figure out what they want we will not win as a party. i think they are conservative and we should balance the budget but they don't think we should be at war all the time. say one more tolerance to put people in prison for possession of marijuana comment to see more local judges, less present time. i am not encouraging people to use marijuana but don't think they should be in jail for it either. >>host: we did a long interview on your first book you can see that on book tv's.org. the premise? >> the tea party goes to washington and. with the tea party movement probably the biggest happen in 40 years. hundreds of thousands of people were showing up and it transformed the way we think that people began to question the law that was passed as obamacare
, a great commissioner of education in indiana who lost his election -- [applause] >> and doing what's right, doing what's right is not necessarily politically rewarding all the time. that's not why we do this. but it is the right thing to do to transform our system of compensation and evaluation for teachers to the 21st century. and then the third thing i would say, the fourth thing i was is that school choice is the catalytic converter to accelerate these things at a faster pace to if you believe like i do that we need to move this down the field faster, charter schools, vouchers, all sorts of alternatives so parents are more engaged and we create a more open system is part of the answer to the our over 2 million students in charter schools today. thanks to the work of many people in this room. 100 school districts now have 10% or more of their public school students in charter schools. louisiana this last year passed sweeping scholarship, sweeping scholarship program for low performing schools. kudos again to the center for job well done. and many other states are looking at it. and i wou
already enrolled me in band and it wasn't something they chose. they put me there. it was an elective. which i didn't elect. i was lucky to have been put in that class because when i walked in there and the teacher said, which instrument do you want to play? and i first i thought i had to pay for them. i say how much does it cost? and when he said it doesn't cost you anything, it just seemed like the whole world opened up to me. and i got to choose whichever instrument i wanted. i saw the sax is a phone it's the one i wanted. >> do you play it today? >> i i don't play anymore and i haven't since i graduated from pass deana city college. i never owned my own. they didn't have marring band. i didn't have anything to join. and then i discovered a whole bunch of other things, i got in to dance, i got in to filming video and all the other things i was doing and i really missed the instrument. i wanted to get back in to plying, ab then one of my teachers pulled my aside one day and she said, it's god that you're creative and you love to explore and learn new things, but you need to choose o
in band. it wasn't something that i chose. they put me there. it was an elective, which i didn't elect, but i was so lucky to have been put in that class because when i walked in there and the teacher said, which instrument do you want to play, and at first i thought i had to pay for them and i say, how much does it cost? and when he said it doesn't cost you anything. it just seemed like the whole world just opened up to me, and i can to choose whichever i wanted and i saw the saxophone and it was so beautiful, and that's the one i wanted. >> do you still played today? >> i don't play anymore, and i haven't played since i graduated from college because i never owned my own saxophone. when i went to you see, they didn't have marching band so i didn't have anything to join. and then i discovered a whole bunch of other things, you know, i got into dance, into film and video. i got into like all these other things that i was doing, and i really missed the saxophone and a wanted to get back into playing. and one of my teachers pulled inside one day, and she said you know, it's really good y
remember after i was elected for the first time in 93 and i would see a couple of bright white kids in these low-income communities, troubled, challenged neighborhoods, troubled, challenged schools, and then what is that kids story? the teacher tells me those children seem to be so energetic, so effervescent, so much potential and then lo and behold a couple of years later what happened to that kid? he dropped out. he got caught up in the streets. .. >> we reduce the murder rate by 20%. and so all of these indicators are out there, that there's nothing more important than education. so i just became passionate about this. and even to the this day, 15, 19 years later, it's the only thing that keeps me up at night, to know that there are children who are going to wake up in this country who are going to go to school that won't serve them well. and over a short period of time whatever potential that today had, that they were given through stent of birth -- through accident of birth, they will lose. and there's something tragic about that. so, yeah, i was out in front. i said, you know,
the employment numbers. 1 million more private sector jobs over the last two years. since the last election, 190,000 fewer people on out of work benefits. just in the last quarter, employment up by 100,000, unemployment down by 49,000. while we're at it, let's just remember, labour's poisonous legacy. youth unemployment up 40%. women unemployment up 24%. 5 million on out of work benefits. that's the legacy we're dealing with and we're getting the country back to work. [shouting] >> ed miliband. >> i wish for once, mr. speaker, you would just answer the question. i asked him a very civil question about whether long-term unemployment had gone up by 96% since the work program was introduced and and its issues. while he's talking about labour's program, let's talk about the future jobs fun. last friday the government entered a very interesting document, mr. speaker. he spent two years rubbishing the future jobs fun. what does this document say? it said the scheme provided net benefit to participants, their employers and society as a whole. in other words, it was a success. it held 120,000 young peop
that when he was, i think, very prematurely awarded the nobel peace prize being elected president, he shows up at oslow before the nobel peace committee and delivers what i think is probably the only pro-war speech ever given in acceptance of the nobel peace prize. he argues for the necessity of war, but argues for the necessity of american power and for his responsibility to use american power in the world. i think that was a fairly remarkable speech. that coupled with the fact that there is the remote targeting of suspected terrorists says to me that people's expectations about him as a sort of passist leaning president was misguided. he's clearly not that, and nothing shows that more than his decision to go after bin laden. now, when i talk about main characters in the story, forgive me, because i don't think about these things in the way scholars do or maybe that you would doing an analysis for the military. i'm a story teller. to me, i'm interested in the arc of characters in the story. you've got admiral in a wheelchair, months after 9/11, who gets an opportunity to work in the white
a bully. someone has to stand up to a bully. >> november 2012, post-election. the 2012 elections clarify for you? >> well, that we as republicans need to do something to grow as a party. we are in danger of becoming a dinosaur if we don't figure out what people want out on the west coast, new england, around the great lakes. solid blue. and so we figure out what people want we're not the right to win again as a party. >> what do you think they want. >> i think they are conservative. they think we should balance our budget, but i also think they don't think we should be at war everywhere all the time. the one little more tolerance in policy as far as putting people in prison for possession of marijuana. think it would like to see more local judges take care of that, less prison time. i'm not in favor of encouraging people to use marijuana, but i also don't think we should be putting people in jail for another. >> this is your second book. redid along former interview on your first book. you can watch that at booktv.org. the premise of that first book. >> the first book was the tea party g
of the big three automakers, tough call. by the way, i don't know why anyone in this presidential election mentions that this is a bush program. i have a chapter about left, right forward. we need to at least get history rate. continue to the other, that's not what it is about either. but what would've happened if we would've let it go? would've been all this manufacturing access, contracts out the door. skill itself by factory at 10 activist resources? what would happen if we had the courage to do that? again, i think he would've been a big risk. but it would've been exciting. it either been a great thing for american auto workers. poster we are talking with philip auerswald, professor here at george mason university. his most recent book, "the coming prosperity: how entrepreneurs are transforming the global economy." he also served as an adviser to the clinton global initiative. what do you advise on? >> guest: while clutching a knack for asking me that question. purchased at the global initiative the last three days and i've been working with them for the last three years. the reason i
and abolish the electoral college, replacing it with direct election of the president was killed in the senate in 1979, but the issue rears its head every four years when people look around and wonder why america needs this antiquated contraption. and, unfortunately, i was looking in here for the name of the book. two people have no ask you. what about posting that on your website? >> if you don't mind my looking i can look in -- i think i have my book right here. perhaps i can come up with it. i believe it is called, how democratic is the american constitution? the author is a yale scholar, and i think, you know, i am under tv lights for too long. my brain is not coming up as something of a measly much better producing. >> host: okay. we are almost out of time anyway. if i give you 30 seconds to answer this question, and that's not very fair. there was an e-mail here that i wanted to finish with. and unfortunately, no i have put it under one of your books. i haven't read here. this is from allison in norman, oklahoma. when i was in elementary school in the 1950's, each classroom displayed a w
of these women will be available behind the election of your to sign copies of their buck. reminder on all those fronts. let me introduce three incredible women. 1985 to 1991, governor of vermont. later united states ambassador both of switzerland and liechtenstein and is author of this book, the new feminist agenda. then professor anita hill, a professor of social policy, law, and women's studies at brandeis university and author of this new book, rematching equality, stories of gender, race, and finding a home. welcome. [applause] and senior editor at the atlantic and founder of women section. also the author of the end of man and the rise of women. so we start off with a couple minutes from each of you on -- a brief summary or a story from your book that you think best encapsulates the ideas that you are presenting. >> thank you very much. it is great to see you all up there and to be here with my sister authoress. what is next for women. my career, my political life really started with the woman's movement in the 70's. and we had great expectations, some of which have been at. the very fact
. to me, the real danger is if the romney gets elected, they might actually do what they say they might do. >> that is remarkable feature of the political environment pitcher best hope is one of the candidates is that line carries teeth. >> we sit now in what feels like prolonged stagnation. joe, you've written a book on inequality. this could not be a positive development for the distribution proceeds to have the called the reserve army of the unemployed driving wages down, weakening the bargaining power. >> inequality has become a serious problem in the united states. it is interesting while polls are arguing in a good a long time, it gotten so serious that even economists realize it's a serious problem. when they say serious problem coming got to believe it. not our colleagues. but the magazine's economists. >> it's my job to take them on. you guys take on the magazine. one of the reasons that it weakens the economy, you know, paul emphasized the problem right now is lots of demand, lack of total demand that means people are not buying as many goods in the economy and capacity to produc
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